Meet VR Expert Alex Tartakovsky

Are you curious about what VR experts think about the future of the VR industry? What about how their VR journeys started? Well, that is no longer a secret as we launch our series of interviews with VR experts.

We begin with Alex Tartakovsky, the director of Inlusion Netforms, an enterprise XR software development firm. Alex shares with us his first encounter with VR, his thoughts regarding the future of VR, and his idea for the VR survival kit. Please don’t forget to Clap for this article if you enjoy it!


1. What was your first encounter with VR like?

My first VR experience was at the Cannes Film Festival. There was a VR demo based on the Robert Zemeckis film ‘The Walk’ where you could experience the death-defying stunt featured in the movie — walking a tightrope between the buildings of New York’s World Trade Center. I put on the headset, and I could not do it. I could not move forward on the virtual tightrope! Even though I knew I was standing on a convention room carpet I still could not move. I was amazed at how the brain can be tricked so easily!

2. Will VR/AR eventually replace 2D screen content consumption or will they coexist?

It’s been 91 years since the first broadcast appeared on television. That’s quite a long history that demonstrates serious staying power. VR/AR will coexist with 2D content for a long time, but our “view anytime, anyplace” culture will certainly speed up acceptance of virtual technology. In addition, 5G has the potential to revolutionize this medium and deliver high definition content anywhere in the world. These technological advances will transform the delivery of education, news, and entertainment in real-time, and possibly even in augmented or virtual reality.

3. Is there anything that will never be possible to convey in VR?

Theoretically, I don’t believe so. However, as it stands today our beloved industry certainly has some hurdles to overcome. First, the hardware still has some catching up to do. The potential exists to create an immersive experience just like you experience in the real world, but today’s sophisticated consumer has very high standards in order to be satisfied. There is certainly significant progress being made, especially this year, but for universal adoption, there remains considerable work to do.

The potential exists to create an immersive experience just like you experience in the real world, but today’s sophisticated consumer has very high standards in order to be satisfied.

Another limitation is price — VR is still too expensive for the mass market. Here too significant progress is being made — the Oculus Quest is quite a headset for its price, coming in at $399. Again, I am looking at this question from a global perspective. In the US we might have no problem spending $400 for new and innovative technology, but what will the attitude be in other parts of the world? Success will only be realized if there is enough demand by the mass market.

Success will only be realized if there is enough demand by the mass market.

Finally, the last hurdle I wanted to mention is content — there is not much out there. Sure, you can surf the web and see all kinds of development work in progress, but it pales in comparison to other mediums. For domestic television, for example, there are an estimated 32,000 hours of content developed each year. Content will be the key to VR/AR success, and this is the strategic direction that Inlusion is taking.

Content will be the key to VR/AR success, and this is the strategic direction that Inlusion is taking.

4. If you were preparing a survival kit for a VR developer containing essential hardware and software tools they simply couldn’t do without, what would it include?

That’s easy — Varwin Reality Management System, especially the Business Edition. I would not consider a VR studio to be professional without this fantastic tool.

5. If you had the power and budget to do absolutely anything for the VR industry, what would you do?

We are currently working on a pretty exciting project for the movie industry. It’s still top secret and in the early stages, but it is a very exciting time at Inlusion. Personally, the more innovative and challenging a project is the more I love it. It gets my creative juices flowing.

Personally, the more innovative and challenging a project is the more I love it. It gets my creative juices flowing.

Thank you, Alex, for sharing your thoughts with us! We wish you and your company the best with your future projects!

Please make sure to subscribe to our Medium channel as well as our other social media accounts. Also, let us know in the comments if you would like to participate in this series or if you have a VR expert in mind that you would love for us to interview. Stay inspired with Varwin!

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